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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 28, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm BST

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a breast surgeon — ian paterson — has been convicted of intentionally wounding patients by performing unnecessary operations. the police say that they have foiled a potential terror plot. the armed entry was necessary due the nature of the intelligence we were dealing with and involved armed officers firing cs gas into the address. it's understood that the man arrested in whitehall yesterday is mohammed khalid omar ali, who's 27 and originally from north london. britain's economy slowed sharply at the start of the year. official figures show gdp grew byjust 0.3%. also, love in the next hour— a study finds that the fund — which was one of david cameron's hour— flagship policies, wasted more than a billion pounds of public money. less tha n
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less than a fifth of its drugs helped patients. they're off! cycling's three—day tour de yorkshire get‘s underway this lunchtime. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. ian paterson breast surgeon has been convicted of intentionally wounding patients by performing "completely unnecessary" operations. let's go over to nottingham. we do today's verdict will help the victims move on with their lives and start to recover from what has happened to them. it has been seen in court that ian paterson hasn't shown any remorse for the terrible things that his son. he's really
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damaged the trust that the public heard in the set health service and with health professionals. we hope never to see a case like this again. how would you describe ian paterson? pardon? i've never come across a case like this. certainly in my time with the west midlands police. these cases are very rare with the west midlands police. these cases are very rare and with the west midlands police. these cases are very rare and i hope never to see a case like this again. how would you describe them? is that he showed northernmost. yes, he's shown no remorse. it's hard to describe someone no remorse. it's hard to describe someone who has done such things. he struggled to find his word. —— you've struggled to find your word to describe them. i wouldn't be able to describe them. i wouldn't be able to put a number on it. what i can say is that the west midlands police
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have spoken to dodge and a0 of his patients. all the fun, we have taken state m e nts patients. all the fun, we have taken statements from. —— have spoken to 2a0. statements from. —— have spoken to 240. why did he do it? there has been a lot of speculation. that includes for financial gain, because some of the victims said he wanted to play god with their lives are got some sort of satisfaction out of giving the bad news and telling them he is making better. we don't know, it's not cut much of the trial. we will probably never know. —— it's not come out. inaudible. the fact is when you go to a doctor you call in the belief that they will treat you as best they can and you trust what they are doing and the treatment they are doing and the treatment
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they recommend. has assets, he's caused huge damage in terms of the trust that the public has in the health service. that'll take some time to repairand health service. that'll take some time to repair and probably will never prepare for his victims. you are convinced, are you, that this was trying to play god anyway with patients' lives? that's the way that patients' lives? that's the way that patients have described his actions. i don't know what is true motivation was. financial motivation is something featured. unless he tells us something featured. unless he tells us what his motivation was, we will never know. inaudible.. the investigation has been very thorough, one quarter yea rs. been very thorough, one quarter years. we've looked at a lots of the
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people that worked with him. the only person that we have felt fit to bring charges against was ian paterson. we will be putting anybody else that worked with him. —— we will not be pursuing anybody else that worked for them. this is debbie douglas, former pastors and patient. cani douglas, former pastors and patient. can i ask what your thoughts are?” am so relieved thatjustice has been done. it has been dramatic notjust for the victims' families. the ladies that are no longer with us, i'd like to say thank you to the jewellery. they got the right verdict. thank god finally he has been brought to justice. verdict. thank god finally he has been brought tojustice. there verdict. thank god finally he has been brought to justice. there will been brought to justice. there will be so much more that you will do because so many more affected patients that were not and could not
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be reported on. how difficult was it to relieve the experience? —— relive the experience? i thought that people that we were kisses were very brave. dated to people to trial that they thought would take the right decision. —— they took the people to trial that they thought would get the right decision. can you describe your emotions when the jury came back with the verdict? sort of belief. just absolute release and i prayed that the right verdict would be reported and it would be kitty. i just felt... i haven't taken a toll on because it has been such a long journey. total relief. do you think this will give you closure?|j journey. total relief. do you think this will give you closure? i think it's a start. we've waited so long for this. it's been years. trying to hold everything together, trying to
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get on with a normal life and raise your kids and look after your family and husband, everybody that supported us, hopefully now we can move on and please, god, he gets the right sentence. after faith. move on and please, god, he gets the right sentence. afterfaith. i move on and please, god, he gets the right sentence. after faith. i told everybody i was lucky to have the best consultants. told everyone that i was likely to be with private medicine so i can get it straightaway and get treated. years down the line, i find out all of that has been betrayed. i've been left physically damaged, if feel like i be mutilated. all these guys i thought were there because they we re i thought were there because they were a badge of honour and now he has mutilated me. —— all the skies i thought were there because. i've
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been through this for nothing. inaudible. i am angry that we have waited so long. this has not only physically but mentally damaged patients. i know ladies that phone every night and say they cannot sleep. they prayed thatjustice has been done. they cannot go outside the house. they have had years of mental anguish. thank god justice has been done. i've had to fight for information in my own case. lots of things rating. though god now these brave people that spoke up in court have got the right verdict. his son" with his head in his hands as the verdict was delivered. —— he had his head in his hands. what are your thoughts towards him now?|j head in his hands. what are your thoughts towards him now? i stared at his face and i wanted to see him
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suffer. i wanted to see justice done. i wanted suffer. i wanted to see justice done. iwanted him suffer. i wanted to see justice done. i wanted him to admit he had done. i wanted him to admit he had done something wrong. he's never admitted it and put the people out of misery and said, i'm guilty, i damaged you. i still hold him in co nte m pt damaged you. i still hold him in contempt because i think, you have never given anybody any beast, you'd never given anybody any beast, you'd never explained motives. —— any piece of this. he should spend a long time injail. piece of this. he should spend a long time in jail. what you think of motives were? money a factor. i had a good cover, good insurance. he literally had a licence to get money from. you could send me forfive stands, could give you another operation, will give the major surgery. operation, will give the major surgery. then continually kept the envelope. when you were taught you have cancer, and i did have cancer,
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ididn't have cancer, and i did have cancer, i didn't have the operation that i needed and i should have just had a incision and i had a full mastectomy. i had chemotherapy that they didn't need. to me, it was a moneymaking issue. he also had some kind of god complex, he tells you, your cute though. —— you work your now. consultants to not say that because they don't use the term in general. he is to use that term, i used to work at —— i used to work at thinking, he's driven. 0ther patients ended up with secondary cancer because he didn't do the job properly. we will never know if it was bad luck that you got cancer or that the surgeon left breast tissue. that is from the kennedy report and the lady has died down. i've
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remember all the ladies. a lot of the minute and priscilla. i'm sure there are men out there, male patients, but i can speak for the ones that i know. madrasahs been done... this has been a four-year struggle, he said. how hard has it been? i've got two different vehicles. there is another one going on. it's been tough to get the right information. you will not get in fa ct, information. you will not get in fact, you were getting a loss of cover—ups. he would put that your notes were lost. thank god, now the struggle is over. he will get what he deserves, please, god. the kennedy report... how do you feel about the fact that these concerns existed for a long time amongst collea g u es existed for a long time amongst colleagues and in the various hospitals in britain? that is what
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is so shameful. if you look at the 1996, when he first operated on a patient and was under a supervision order, he basically did not have that follow him to the new hospital, he continued to keep operating people and making mistakes. there we re people and making mistakes. there were numerous opportunities where they could have stopped him. a radiologist in 2003 said that you should look at the result, these are not allowed. —— these are not right. they had all that time to investigate. the flags were there and it was an obvious thing that he was guilty. but they did nothing about it? they did nothing. he was a cash cow. he was probably a cash cow for the nhs. he was getting the figures down. what they didn't do was properly ordered him and look at
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him and look at what he was doing. —— properly audit them. he became very rich because of it. thank you, debbie. thanks. i'm linda milburn 's and i'm a member at thompsons solicitors. we act for approximately judging facilities that are victims of his treatment. —— george and 50 ladies that are victims of his treatment. we have a civil case that the results later in the curate in the high court in london. we able to attain compensation for all of them. —— we hope to be able to attain. attain compensation for all of them. -- we hope to be able to attain. how many woman i do? ardour also people in that claim that are perhaps
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needed operations but got them at the wrong time. —— ardour also people in that claim that happened needed operations? some people had incorrect diagnosis and had totally erroneous treatment. 0thers incorrect diagnosis and had totally erroneous treatment. others have been overtreated. david gilbert have been overtreated. david gilbert have been let down by the system? —— do you feel they have been let down by the system ? you feel they have been let down by the system? this is not only against ian paterson but also the hospitals and the trust. neither a new hospital authorities took the necessary steps to protect our victims and clients. have you come across a case like this before?“ never had one with the recall has gone into hundreds. there may still be victims out there that have not come forward. 0k. thank you. we have
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been hearing about the results of a trial, a surgeon, ian paterson, a breast surgeon, he has been found guilty of 20 charges altogether relating to unnecessary operations. we heard from one patient, debbie douglas, who thought about the suffering she had. after we had linda milbank who say they will pursue a civil case for 350 clients. ian paterson has not yet been sentenced but we do have a background on all of this. ian paterson was 59 years old. found guilty of 20 charges in total, relating to nine women and one man. dominic hughes reports. surgeon ian paterson. well—liked and trusted by patients facing the frightening prospect of breast cancer — but for some of them it was an entirely false diagnosis. one such patient is frances perks, who
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underwent a series of operations and a mastectomy, all of them unnecessary. how can somebody do that? and say things that he did, knowing that you didn't need these operations. how can anybody in their right mind, how can they do that to people? ijust find it unbelievable and how he's made us all suffer and people who have lost their lives. how could...? that's pure evil to me. pure evil. during the trial, the jury heard a succession of patients describe a pattern of behaviour. how ian paterson told them that they were at risk of cancer, had precancerous cells and needed to have lumps or entire breasts removed. expert witnesses told the court that the risk was nonexistent or greatly exaggerated and no
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reasonable surgeon would have acted in the way ian paterson did. this case revolves around ian paterson's work out to private —— ian paterson's work at two private hospitals in the west midlands, although he also worked for the nhs, where he treated hundreds more patients. the ten patients whose treatment formed the heart of this case were drawn from a sample group of more than 200 people whose medical notes were assessed by a group of experts. but we may never know exactly how many people were affected by the actions of ian paterson over a long career both here in the private sector and in the nhs. he treated thousands of people. police say that even at this stage his motives remain unclear. he just wanted to play god with their lives. he took pleasure in telling them that they need procedures and know he could make them better. he received some perverse pleasure from those practices. since 2011,
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hundreds of patients have been recalled to hospital to be told they we re recalled to hospital to be told they were operated on for no good reason. they are struggling to comprehend what has been done to them. they are struggling to comprehend what has been done to themlj thought, oh, my, god. this is all adding up and now making a bit of sense. that what i'd been told was the truth and what others led to believe from 2002 to 2011 was a pack of lies. two highly critical enquiries into ian paterson's nhs and private sector work have been carried out. now the career of this once respected surgeon lies in ruins of his patients are left to deal with the knowledge that they had been assaulted by a man they trust. sima kotecha joins us now from nottingham crown court. just tell it what happened in court?
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around one o'clock, thejudge called a zen and told the jury that he wa nted a zen and told the jury that he wanted a majority verdict. minutes later, thejury said wanted a majority verdict. minutes later, the jury said they had a verdict. the sounds ian paterson 59 yea rs verdict. the sounds ian paterson 59 years old, a breast surgeon, guilty of winding with intent. 17 currents of winding with intent. 17 currents of wounding with intent. three cou nts of wounding with intent. three counts of winding. just find me on these steps we heard from one of his victims, debbie douglas, who gave an emotional statement after hearing the verdict. she said she felt that her body had been violated, she felt she couldn't handle her life at the moment because she's been through such an emotional ordeal. coming to terms with the fact that she had been operated on unnecessarily. in court, when the verdict was delivered, ian paterson put his head in his hands and his two daughters
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that were with him on the bench also started crying. thejudges told us it must return back to court at 2:30pm. we think he may be sentenced. thank you very much for nottingham. police say they've foiled an active terrorist plot after carrying out an armed raid in north—west london. a female suspect was shot during the operation and is in a serious but stable condition in hospital. six people have been arrested on suspicion of the commission, preparation and instigation of terrorist acts. two women, two men and a 16—year—old boy were arrested at or near the property yesterday evening; another woman was detained in kent. police said the operation was unconnected to the arrest yesterday of a 27—year—old man armed with knives in westminster. richard galpin reports. early yesterday evening in north—west london. and armed police begin
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their raid on a house here. gunshots sparking alarm in the neighbourhood. as i made my way to the living room i heard bang, bang, bang! so i ran to the front window and i saw police officers aiming and i ran to my partner in the kitchen and said there are armed officers and heard another bang, another bang. the sun newspaper obtained this amateur video showing officers pointing their weapons at the house. by the end of the operation, five people had been arrested here. and this appears to show officers attending to someone outside the house. the police have said they shot and seriously injured a woman. they believe they foiled an active terrorist plot. last night at approximately 7pm, our highly trained firearms officers carried out a specialist entry into an address in harlesden road. we had that under
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observation as part of a current counterterrorism investigation. the armed entry was necessary due to the nature of the intelligence we were dealing with and involved officers firing cs gas into the address. during the course of that operation, one of the subjects, a woman, was shot by police. she remains in hospital. i can say that her condition is serious but stable. it's thought to be the first time a woman has been shot by the police for a decade and it's now being investigated by the independent police complaints commission. meanwhile, the police have been searching three more houses in london, including here in willesden, where yesterday's raid took place. earlier yesterday, there had been another incident in central london. a 27—year—old man arrested by armed police near downing street and the foreign office in a separate counterterrorism operation which was
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apparently intelligence lead. nearby, they found a rucksack with knives inside. this is how we prevent terrorism. what you saw today and yesterday is police preventing a terrorist attack, which is important because when a person gets to the point of blowing themselves up or shooting people it's too late, we willjust have victims. what we need to do is what we saw, police intervening before the attack happens. this has been a traumatic period for londoners. memories are still fresh of the five people killed in the attack near parliamentjust a few weeks ago and now it seems the police are uncovering many more alleged plots in the capital. our correspondent andy moore is in north—west london. is there still is a lot of activity
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there? yes, the police are still here. there are researchers —— are researchers at other addresses. the house behind me as the one with a large grey satellite dish. if you look at one of the top for windows on the right—hand side, you can see damage to the window there. that is where the gas canisters were fired into the top four. a total of five people were arrested. a young man of 16 years old, man and a woman both an early 20s, a man and woman both aged 28. a link to arrest was the a3—year—old woman in kent. police say this location had been under surveillance and they had to make an armed edge reduced to —— armed entry
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due to intelligence. what the intelligence was we do not know. before it from neighbours about what happened. they talk about the police five and weapons. people coming out of the property. one neighbour said that a woman came out apparently injured and was shouting and screaming. she was surrounded by 5—6 medics that were trying to treat. she was shouting, don't touch me, don't touch my dress, don't go through my dress! a woman was taken into a stretcher. we believe that was government that was injured. she's 21 years old and set to be seriously injured. she's a suspect in the case but has not been charged. —— she's 21 years old and is said to be seriously injured. the suspect in the westminster attack yesterday has been named.
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with me is our home affairs correspondent june kelly. the man has been named as doctor mac. his 27 and is said to be a british national that was not born in the uk. he went to school in nottingham. he was on the radar of m15 is nottingham. he was on the radar of mi5 is understood it was a tip—off from a concerned family member that led to the dramatic arrest yesterday. that is why police took the decision to move in on. knives we re the decision to move in on. knives were recovered from the scene. this man is now in custody at a high security south london police station. meanwhile, such as going on at london addresses. —— searches are going on at london addresses. let's get the weather.
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bank holiday weekend not looking too horrendous. lots of dry weather. the latest images from the uk. lots of clouds across the west. this will produce the odd shower and some cloud breaks elsewhere. most it will be tried this afternoon. tonight, it'll be on the cool side. a future was initially fading away and rain and breeze into the hebrides later on. temperatures could be low enough across rural parts of wales, england and scotland scotland for some fast. —— for some frost. the rain clears away in the hebrides. some showers in the west. that's majority in the uk. saturday will be reasonably sunny with some broken club. it will
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feel pleasantly warm. full black holiday weekend comes up in half—hour. see them. —— hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... a breast surgeon, ian pattison, has been convicted of intentionally wounding patients by performing unnecessary operations. the victims are accusing him of wanting to play god. police say the armed raid carried out in north—west london last night — in which a woman was shot by armed officers — was to prevent an active terrorist plot. it is understood that a terror suspect arrested in westminster yesterday is khalid mohammed omar ali, who's 27 and grew up in north london. economic growth suffered a worse—than—expected slowdown in the first three months of the year, official figures show. a scheme to improve access to the latest cancer drugs in england didn't help many patients
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and was a "huge waste of money" — according to researchers. the anticipation is well and truly building ahead of what will be one of the fights of the year. britain's anthony joshua takes on wladimir klitschko with the ibf and wba world titles at stake at wembley tomorrow night. our sports reporter olly forster is at wembley arena where the two fighters have weighed in. wladimir klitschko is 1a years older
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than anthony joshua but wladimir klitschko is 1a years older than anthonyjoshua but ten lbs lighter. he has really kept himself trim. i have just lighter. he has really kept himself trim. i havejust got back lighter. he has really kept himself trim. i have just got back to this life point. i will be speaking to deontay wilder, are very interested observer tomorrow night he said he will go looking for the winner of this, another massive unification fight on the cards. that would be something for the promoters to get their heads together about again. at their heads together about again. at the moment we look forward to this fight breaking all records. did we hear anything from the crowd? there was a little speech from anthony joshua on the stage. he was very
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graciously thanking them for their support. saying he will do it for them tomorrow night. radio five live managed to grab a very quick word with the ibf heavyweight champ.- six foot six apiece, a good fighter. lam six foot six apiece, a good fighter. i am ready to go as far as i need to go to get the win. i have shown it before. that is all it is. i have skill and determination but i'm willing to dig deep. how deep will he have to dig? we will head off to wembley stadium as well. we'll be live from ringside, if they have built the ring. onto football now. the arsenal manager arsene wenger believes the only way to avoid players betting on matches would be
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to eliminate gambling altogether in society. wenger says he's not surprised many people become addicted since betting is "found everywhere. " his comments come in the wake of burnley midfielderjoey barton's 18 month ban for breaking rules concerning gambling. if you do not want people to drink, you do not serve alcohol. if you do not want people to bet, do not make betting official. it is inside people to bet. some get addicted and bet. we don't want to have that. mark selby has staged an early comeback in his world snooker championship semi—final with ding junhui. the defending champion came into today trailing 5—3 but took the first four frames of the second session to build a 7—5 lead in what's a repeat of last year's final. it's been back and forth since then but selby has managed to keep a 2—frame advantage — now leading 9—7.
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in the other semi finaljohn higgins leads barry hawkins 5—3 after their opening session. they'll resume shortly at the crucible. sebastian vettel looks determined to increase his lead in the formula one drivers' championship after topping the timesheets in practice ahead of this weekend's russian grand prix. the ferrari driver was a quarter of a second ahead of his team mate kimi raikkonen and more than half a second ahead of the mercedes of valtteri bottas and championship rival lewis hamilton. several teams showed their support for british teenager billy monger who had both legs amputated following a crash in a formula four race a fortnight ago. more than three quarters of a million pounds has been raised to help his recovery. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. official figures show the uk economy grew by 0.3% at the start of the year, the slowest growth rate since the first three months of 2016. the office for national statistics
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said rising prices and a fall in spending were partly to blame. with me is laith khalaf a senior financial analyst at hargreaves landsown. we get very excited in newsrooms about gdp and what it means. a lot of people think about what is this magical, mystery figure and why is it so important? it is the simplest and most widespread number two tellers how the economy is doing. we have seen the number come out today of .3%. that means the economy is growing and growing very slowly. that has come into focus because of the brexit vote. we get a marked slowdown in the economy. some will ta ke slowdown in the economy. some will take this as a sinus is starting to come along now. what is at play in terms of what brings down the gross figure? what we have seen in the last quarter is inflation. that has
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picked up and hit the gdp figure hard. real wages are not growing. wages are going up atjust 2.57. inflation is going up a little bit more. that is putting a squeeze on us more. that is putting a squeeze on us in terms of how much we can go out and spend in the economy. what do the gdp figures tell us about what sectors in the economy are doing well and which are less well? where is the movement? the main movement has come from retail spending, consumerspending. movement has come from retail spending, consumer spending. it movement has come from retail spending, consumerspending. it is about wages and inflation. that is an important driver of economic growth. the biggest part of our economy is the services sector. that had a poor performance. manufacturing, also a little bit disappointing, particularly in light of the fact the pound has fallen back so much. for some manufacturers, the weaker pound
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could be a growth opportunity because they could have more buyers than expected. that would be the case. i think you should wait longer. if you look back to when the pound started falling it was last summer. quite a lot of exporters would already have had contracts in place at that time. we do need to wait for that information to come through. it is not that the economy is not growing, it is growing at a lesser rate than expected, .3%. that can seem lesser rate than expected, .3%. that can seem like a tiny figure. how much nuance makes a difference? how can we see much nuance makes a difference? how can we see what it means in real terms for people living their lives and running their businesses?“ terms for people living their lives and running their businesses? it is and running their businesses? it is a good question. .3% is the first quarter of this year. you probably should not take one quarter in isolation. you should look at the bigger picture. the bank of england
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is looking at 1.5% to 2% growth this year but at this number has come in below that. they may have to revise that figure. the bank of england is looking very keenly at retells spending. that is what has fallen off with these figures. -- retail spending. interesting to pick some of that with you. thank you very much indeed. the president of the european council, donald tusk, has said an agreement on "people, money and ireland" must come before negotiations on the european union's future relationship with the uk. mr tusk‘s message came in a letter to 27 eu leaders — but not the uk. he will chair a summit for the 27 in brussels tomorrow to try to adopt a joint negotiating position on brexit. our correspondent ben brown joins me now from brussels. good afternoon. good afternoon. that summit tomorrow of the 27 remaining
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eu leaders will really nailed down the eu's negotiating position in the brexit ago she asians. it has already pretty much been sorted out by ministers meeting in luxembourg. —— negotiations. there will be a brief summit tomorrow here. donald task has written to the 27 making it clear that britain cannot go she ate in parallel, the future trade deal and the terms of its divorce. —— cannot negotiate. we must first sort out the past. that is the way the eu sees out the past. that is the way the eu seesit out the past. that is the way the eu sees it and that is their negotiating stance. our correspondent is with me here in brussels. the eu 27 seem united in the way they want to negotiate brexit. they are. it is what we will see today and tomorrow from the
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leaders when they agree these guidelines. they will be agreed within minutes of the leaders gathering. there is not much they need to discuss on this. what you have to remember is, in the nine months or so, the eu side has been preparing for this. they moved very quickly after the brexit vote. they have been holding summits to look at the issues. all of those have pushed the issues. all of those have pushed the 27 countries together, cohering on one side of the table around one set of positions will stir that is what we will see tomorrow. ahead of this we have seen a war of words between angela merkel and theresa may. angela merkel said britain should not have any illusions about getting favourable treatment. theresa may said the other 27 are lining up to oppose this. is this just rhetoric, do you think?” lining up to oppose this. is this just rhetoric, do you think? i think it is more than rhetoric. there is a
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real concern on the eu side. angela marco was expressing this. it has come... there have been delegations going to london in the last few weeks. —— angela merkel. there are concerns they feel about the prospects of negotiation and what they feel are unrealistic expectations, or some of the climates of discussion in the uk. that is around things like money, ideas that for the uk this is a brexit bill, and exit fee the uk could refuse to pay. they are very worried about things like that blowing up partly because of politics in the uk and they are worried about unrealistic expectations, saying you could get as good a deal outside as inside. they want that realism, or they believed negotiations will get bogged down very quickly. donald
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tusk saying there have to be sufficient progress before they can discuss the free trade deal. that is something the leaders will be discussing tomorrow amongst themselves. it will come down to a couple of things. on the money, they will want very clear commitments from the uk to pay for things it signed up to. projects that extend into the future. this is payments to scientists and farmers. all sorts of projects the eu has agreed with the uk as projects the eu has agreed with the ukasa projects the eu has agreed with the uk as a member. they want clear commitments on map and on citizens rights. will those be respected? that means some very clear detailed negotiations on that. they will not entertain any more discussions about a future relationship, a trade deal, until they are satisfied. it will even be at the point when the eu
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negotiators will say they are not allowed to talk about it legally until they are satisfied on these points. that is what we will hear tomorrow. you get a sense that the eu 27 are very much in the driving seat for the negotiations. tomorrow isa seat for the negotiations. tomorrow is a very brief summit. brexit is the only item on the agenda. it will last for just over three the only item on the agenda. it will last forjust over three and a half hours. thank you very much. back here, there has been a drop in house prices for the second month in a row. with me now is ourfinance correspondent. house prices going down. what is going on? it is significant if families are feeling the squeeze. shopping prices are
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going up. filling up the car, heating the home. the squeeze on thatis heating the home. the squeeze on that is affecting their ability to pay more for property. it is not unusualfor pay more for property. it is not unusual for prices to fall in a month. what is significant is what has happened over a couple of months. in april, there has been a fall of .a%. then the previous month as well. in march, prices were down .3%. it is probably five years where we have had two consecutive months showing a fall like that. year on year it is still up by 2.6%. that is the lowest for some years. you can see a the lowest for some years. you can see a trend. i will show the average price of a home in the uk. the nationwide says it is £207,000. you'll notice that is quite a figure. we will come onto regional variations. prices start dipping and
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people will be able to afford those houses again. isn't that will happen? put it the other way around, that figure of £207,000 is too much for some people. if you go to places like london and the south—east, east anglia, some other big cities. prices are unaffordable for some buyers. you would expect some sort of moderation. exactly what you say. prices are too high for some people. the buyers are not there and they have to come down. you mentioned the variations. they are striking. what is going on in the south—east is not reflected in the north of england. in the north—east of england prices have stayed pretty low. in the north—west as well and northern ireland. in wales they are low as well. the trend in recent months, in london there have been big falls, particularly in central london. other parts of the country have
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taken up the running. with the nationwide, in the last couple of months we have seen a fall. that reflects what is happening in the economy as a whole, families are under pressure. there has been uncertainty talking about gdp. is that moderating? will the economy be able to talk about how i —— higher house prices? in the background, brexit is making everyone nervous as well. thank you. a fund set up to give access to cancer drugs in the nhs has been called a huge amount of money. most of the approved drugs failed to show clinical benefit. the cancer drugs fund was set up to pay for expensive medicines that the nhs was not funding. in part, it was a political response to repeated negative headlines about patients being denied treatment.
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nearly 100,000 patients received drugs, but the study in the journal annals of oncology found just one in five treatments delivered a significant benefit, extending life by an average of three months. researchers say it was an example of policy made on the hoof, and it failed. it was a major missed opportunity for the national health service and the cancer community to learn in the real world about the actual impact of new medicines. a great deal of money, over £1 billion, was expended on this. and we didn't collect the data to look at individual cancer patients. that's a missed opportunity. the study concludes many patients may have suffered unnecessary side—effects from drugs. but a leading breast cancer charity said the fund has had a totally transformational impact for many, offering precious extra time with loved ones for terminally ill patients. the fund was brought under the remit of the national institute
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for health and care excellence last year, so there is greater scrutiny over which treatments are approved. ina in a moment a summary of the business news. breast surgeon ian paterson has been accused of intentionally maiming patients through unnecessary operations. six people have been arrested after a raid in north london. it is understood a terror suspect arrested in westminster yesterday has been named. he is 27 and grew up in north london. hello. let's take a look at the business news. the uk economy grew by .3% at the start of the year.
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that is the slowest growth rate since 2016. latest us figures also just out show the american economy grew .7% in the first three months of the year. that is a sharp slowdown compared with the previous quarter. more on that in a moment. the ra -- quarter. more on that in a moment. the ra —— the quarter. more on that in a moment. the ra -- the rbs quarter. more on that in a moment. the ra —— the rbs and natwest banking apps failed for more than an hour today. some, but banking apps failed for more than an hourtoday. some, but most, of the millions of customers were affected. the bank has not given an explanation for the problem. profit surge at three tech giants. the owners of google increased 28% compared with the same period the year before. there was a boost from advertising on mobile phones. the popular u—tube video service as well. amazon profits climbed as
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well. amazon profits climbed as well. giving them that eight quarters in a row of profit. microsoft had a strong quarter as well. figures out within the last hourfor well. figures out within the last hour for the well. figures out within the last hourfor the us well. figures out within the last hour for the us showed the economy slowed drastically in the first three months of the year, according to the official data. us gdp expanded at an annual rate of .7% in the first quarter. that is a sharp slowdown from the 2.1 growth rate. it is also the lowest rate of growth since the first quarter when the economy contracted. we are joined live from the floor of the new york stock exchange. do you know what is behind this slowdown is right it seems quite dramatic. it is a pretty dramatic slowdown, especially when you compare it with the last quarter where we saw that growth was at
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2.196. where we saw that growth was at 2.1%. the big reason for that is consumer spending. americans were not spending a lot of money. that has been reflected in the growth numbers. when you compare it to the fa ct numbers. when you compare it to the fact that consumer confidence is still really quite high. people are feeling confident about the economy but not actually spending any of the money. that is really why we are seeing this big slowdown. all the other indicators recently have pointed towards potentially increasing interest rates. thejobs data has been strong. do you think this will put the brakes on the federal reserve upping interest rates in the future? that is the big question, whether or not the federal reserve will be raising interest rates. we'll be finding out about that next week when the fed meets for its two day meeting. this will
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be giving them a bit of a pause. the federal reserve considers a host of information, including thejobs numbers and these growth figures. we'll get the latest jobs figures as well, next week, on friday. that would be coming after the federal reserve means. it is really going to be interesting. they're not going to have a full employment picture. these growth figures will give the federal reserve a little bit of a pause. some of the other business news now. mps have accused fox all of showing a reckless disregard for safety in allowing customers to keep driving zafi ra ca rs after a allowing customers to keep driving zafira cars after a fire risk was identified. the problem was with zafi ra identified. the problem was with zafira b cars, which are subject to a recall. the company said lessons
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are to be learned. this could be good news if you're a fan of marks & spencer ‘s poodle such that it is that it wants to enter the crowded market of online food delivery. it isa market of online food delivery. it is a wider push into the food sector which includes opening 200 new stores which will only sell food. the retailer is being a little cautious about its plans, saying it wa nts to cautious about its plans, saying it wants to do a soft trial in the autumn. the royal bank of scotland has reported its first quarterly profit since the first quarter of 2015. shares in the bank opened up almost a% after it posted profits of £259 million in the first three months of 2017. that compares with a £968 million loss a year earlier. let's ta ke £968 million loss a year earlier. let's take a look at the markets. the ftse 100
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let's take a look at the markets. the ftse100 of leading shares is down a touch this afternoon. shares in ba rclays were down a touch this afternoon. shares in barclays were among the biggest fall is on the ftse100. analyst seems “— fall is on the ftse100. analyst seems —— analysts seem disappointed. shares in the royal bank of scotland are going in the other direction. it reported its first quarterly profit. mining companies benefited from a rise in the copper price. i will be back with more in an hour. see you then. here, campaigners claim that controversial plans to build the garden bridge over the river thames are dead, after the mayor said he would not support the project. sadiq khan's written to the garden bridge trust, saying he fears it poses too great a financial risk to london's taxpayers. here's our transport correspondent tom edwards. this is a huge blow for the garden bridge, which is meant to be built here and its future is now hanging by a thread. as part of its planning permissions, which expire in december, it was meant to have financial
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guarantees for maintenance and for operation. today, the mayor pulled the plug on those. the reality is, there is a £70 million funding gap now. the attempts to get pledges going backwards, not forwards, the pledges the garden bridge trust have are less than they were in spring 2015. under those circumstances, i'm not willing to sign a blank cheque. why didn't you kill it day one, a year ago? because i was clear from day one a year ago, no more taxpayer's money that i'm responsible for being spent. i was clear from day one, i wouldn't sign a mayoral guarantee if it meant more money being spent down the road. you've got to be fair. those against the bridge always said it was being built in the wrong place and they also didn't that it was using transport funds for building what in essence was
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a tourist attraction. campaigners now say the whole project is dead. do you think the garden bridge is dead now? yes, without a doubt. they cannot get the money, they haven't got the money. they've spent several years trying to get the money and they need a guarantee. sadiq khan said, i won't underwrite this. londoners won't underwrite this. we won't spend the next 100 years paying £3.5 million keeping this thing alive. there is a tiny chance that the garden bridge trust will find another public body to give these financial assurances, but the wider picture now is political support from the mayor has now evaporated. all of this crucially means that the taxpayer will have lost £a6 million. the big question is why and who is to blame? tom edwards there. the garden bridge trust has said it received the letter with regret. there has been enormous support from funders and they are confident the remaining
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money can be raised. we have been reporting that indian temple macro has been found guilty for unnecessary operations. he will be sentenced next month he has been granted in the meantime conditional bail. -- granted in the meantime conditional bail. —— that ian paterson. a fine day for many. producing the odd shower. the strongest winds way off. when you have the sun out it feels much more pleasant than it has done. you could see a few showers into the first part of the night. later on across the hebrides the rain is pushing in. for most dry night with the old missed fog patch. in scotland there is a chance of
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frost. not a bad start. there will be made initially across the hebrides which would clear through. it is here we will see one or two showers. for the vast majority of uk will be a dry saturday with good brea ks will be a dry saturday with good breaks in the cloud. continuing to feel that little bit warmer. lots of dry weather around this bank holiday weekend. rain only played little pa rt weekend. rain only played little part and weekend. rain only played little partandi weekend. rain only played little part and i will tell about that in half an hour. —— plays a little part. this is bbc news. the headlines at 3:00pm: a breast surgeon — ian paterson — has been convicted of intentionally wounding patients by performing unnecessary operations. police say they've foiled an active terror plot after a woman was shot during a raid on a house in north—west london. the armed entry was necessary due the nature of the intelligence we were dealing with and involved armed officers firing cs gas into the address.
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it's understood that a terror suspect arrested in whitehall yesterday is mohammed khalid omar ali, who's 27 and originally from north london. britain's economic growth slowed sharply at the start of the year. official figures show gdp grew byjust 0.3%. in the next hour: the cancer drugs fund condemned as a huge waste of money. a study finds that it wasted more than a billion
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